Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘soviet’

The Liberal Hour

I guess I’d describe reading this book as if I was walking in a strange world…a liberal world…I didn’t like it.  It is interesting that liberals, like author John Kenneth Galbraith, from that era (this book was first published in 1960) were not quite as socialistic as they are today.  They were socialistic, but not as shrill.  Perhaps one of the endorsements on the back cover says it best, “a reasoned attack on the productivity ethic and a concrete, provocative program for altering the economic structure to maintain a new social balance.”  [emphasis added]

The Case For Democracy

In his book, Decision Points, President George W. Bush mentioned the impact of a book authored by a former Soviet dissident.  Natan Sharansky spent years in Soviet prisons simple because he was Jewish, wanted to leave the USSR, and was vocal about it.  Sharansky shares his experiences first as a political prisoner in the Soviet Union then as an Israeli official.  The Case For Democracy is his story and history as it relates to his experiences in perhaps the two most threatening periods of our time; The Cold War, and The Global War On Terror.  Sharansky provides a compelling case showing “the power of freedom to overcome tyranny & terror.”

We The Living

In most of my reviews I try very hard not to betray the story and allow you to discover it on your own.  In fiction I rarely tell more than what you might read on the inside cover and usually even less.  The fact that We the Living was Ayn Rand’s first novel blows me away.  She admits that many of the characters were influenced by her life.  From her Forward;