Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘service’

Service

My view of a Navy Seal has always been tinged with a lot of respect for the achievement at becoming the best of the best and then getting better.  Having read several books by Seals in the last year has only enhanced that view.  It can be thrilling to read about their exploits, sad when they get injured or lose one of their own, and joyous when they kill a bunch of the bad guys. Service is the second book by Lone Survivor author Marcus Luttrell  and he takes us through his second deployment to the Middle East as he deals with recovering from his injuries and getting back into Seal shape.

Tips For Naught

…Therefore I Am…

I was out and about yesterday so dinner was going to have to be a quick deal and that means take out.  There is a new shopping center not far from our house and much to our delight a Papa John’s Pizza opened.  We like some of the local, independent pizza shops around our house, but we do enjoy Papa John’s too and I used to pick up dinner there a few times a month at one that was located on the route home from work until I switched jobs.  No more Papa John’s until yesterday.  I was visiting my Mom and sister and Papa John’s was one my way home.  I dutifully downloaded the Papa John’s iPhone app, logged in, and ordered our pizza.

In My Time

It seems that I grew up with Dick Cheney and hardly knew it until the last ten years.  Vice President Cheney’s political career and life really spanned my teenage years when he was with Nixon/Ford then Bush 1 then Bush 2.  There is perhaps no greater lightening rod in the Republican party than Mr. Cheney.  I sit near a gentleman at work who volunteered how much he hated Dick Cheney when he noticed that I was reading his book at lunch.  Like his career In My Time is a long account of his time in both the private and public sector.  Mr. Cheney provides a great deal of depth behind many of the most “controversial” decisions made during the Bush presidency.  I used the quotes around controversial because they perhaps weren’t so controversial when you read his side; a side of decisions that were not advanced enough for my taste. 

Flipping the Switch

John G. Miller’s sequel to help guide us in accepting or actually grasping the concept of personal responsibility offers “five keys to success at work and in life” as a way to “unleash the power of personal accountability using the QBQ!” 

In Flipping the Switch Miller again effectively reinforces his points with personal stories.  These anecdotes trigger memories of situations where I have had similar experiences.  Miller’s five keys to success or “fundamental concepts or values that guide our behavior;”

  • Learning – we should all continue to pursue life-long learning as books like this help accomplish
  • Ownership – using “I” more.