Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘scot harvath’

Spymaster

It’s hard to believe that Spymaster is the eighteenth in the Scot Harvath series.  Harvath finds himself pulled in many directions as the poor health of his boss and mentor necessitates more time at base while world events involving the assassinations of NATO officials pull him to the field.  Though not “ripped from the headlines” this thriller seems to highlight some of the NATO issues currently being debated in the world.  Can Harvath and his colleagues keep America from being pulled into a world war that no one except for an evil empire?

Use of Force

It’s hard to believe that Use of Force is the SEVENTEENTH in the Scot Harvath thriller series!  And I’ve enjoyed every one of them. Harvath is still chasing terrorists and when a series of vicious attacks across the world is carried out, Harvath goes into overdrive to try to stop more from happening.  When the investigation has them confront a very old organized crime entity, the weapons and targets are getting very sophisticated as death tolls rise.

Foreign Agent

foreign agent“Islamic terrorism had exploded in Europe.  Americans had been killed.  The United States had been unequivocal about what it expected its European allies to do.  It was time for the gloves to come off.  They were at war.  The terrorists hid among the very people they were slaughtering.  They used the freedom and openness of the West to strike at soft targets…They were not legitimate combatants.  They were savages…They respected one thing and one thing only – force.

Code Of Conduct

code of conductOne of the happy parts of summer is that I know that I’ll get to experience a new Scot Harvath book.  In Code of Conduct the United States and Israel are independently following leads to unravel a mysterious plot that seems to have roots in the Congo where a terrible act was perpetrated at a medical clinic.  The act was so brutal and suspicious that Scot Harvath was tasked to conduct a reconnaissance mission.

Act of War

act of war“The Chinese are extremely deliberate and pragmatic,’ she said.  ‘They can see the writing before anyone else has even seen the wall.  Mr. Director, they’re dying.  Their air is polluted.  Their water is polluted.  They have cut down their timber and have mined all of their minerals.  Less than 5 percent of China has arable land left suitable for agriculture.  The investments they made in North Africa have been a complete bust.  In fact, they’ve taken substantial losses.  The mines there didn’t even produce a fraction of what they had projected.  An during all this, China’s population has continued to expand while its economy has continued to slow…The Chinese know that it’s not daylight they’re seeing at the end of the tunnel.  It’s a train heading right at them.”

Hidden Order

hidden order“The terrain was barren and windswept; more rock and loose shale than anything else. It was cold and misty. Everyone would rather have been someplace else, but you wouldn’t have heard a complaint from a single one of them. This is who they were and what they did. Each of them consoled themselves with the knowledge that no matter how damp and how cold it was, it easily could have been worse, and that what they did, they did for their country. They all knew that there were people who would never know their names and would never know what they were doing this night, but that their way of life hung in the balance.”

Black List

Awesome…Awesome…Awesome…Awesome!

Brad Thor has done it again.  Perhaps stealing from recent headlines about the Presidents “kill list” Thor’s Black List puts hero Scot Harvath once again in grave danger.  Most of his usual resources are no longer at this disposal and he has to rely on old “friends” for help as death seems barely a step behind him as they seem to know his every move.  Perhaps more chilling is the opening note from Brad Thor

“All of the technology contained in this novel is based on systems currently deployed, or in the final stages of development, by the United States government and its partners.”

Full Black

Released in the heat of the summer of 2011, Full Black adds more heat as super agent Scot Harvath is once again thrust in the middle of a vast terrorist network.  Their intent is the same, but the methods and leaders may surprise you.  Author Brad Thor hits another home run in this latest thriller as Harvath and company race across the globe struggling to prevent further attacks.  The list of perpetratorstouch on all of America’s “enemies;” China, Russia, Middle East, Britain, and Globalists.  All Harvath knows is that his security is compromised hence the need to go “full black” refering to deep deep cover. 

Foreign Influence

The frightening thing about Brad Thor’s novels is the shear number of ways that terrorists could hit the United States.  Scot Harvath is back to foil major attempts to hit Americans here and abroad.  Harvath struggles with his age (fortyish), his desire for a family, and his deep hatred of jihadists as he travels the globe hunting down the Islamic fundamentalist organization plotting destruction. 

The Apostle

Common knowledge about Afghanistan and Afghans is generally about how rough a country it is; how inhospitable both the landscape and the residents can be.  It is hard for those of us in the west to imagine a world of dominated by warlords, tribes, and a culture that seems stuck in the first century.  Brad Thor takes us for a brief peek into their lives and gives us a glimpse of what they face.  I get the sense that even though this is a novel, Thor presents an accurate depiction of the troubled country and the battles our military endure.