Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘rights’

What Ever Happened to Penny Candy?

Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? is a rather simple guide to economics written as a series of letters from “Uncle Eric.”  I have read numerous economics books big and small and few offer the fun and engaging lessons in economics.  Perhaps the best thing that I can say about this book is that I learned a lot…a whole lot as evidenced by the number of post-it tabs flagging my volume.  Author Richard J. Maybury spends a great deal of the book on inflation and this excerpt hits home;

MLK, Jr. Was a Republican

Many times as I read an article I find a few sentences that capture the essence of the piece. In “Phrase-e-ology” I’ll post some thought followed by key phrases. As always I’ll have a link (in blue) to the original article.

A few years ago Human Events posted an article about Martin Luther King, Jr. and the fact that he was in fact a Republican and generally, and contrary to the fiction taught and put forward by media, the Democrats fought AGAINST rights for blacks.  It is appropriate to review the FACTS (not the liberal narrative) about Mr. King, Jr., the Democrats, and the civil rights movement.

Consider The Grasshoppers

“Because half a dozen grasshoppers under a fern make the field ring with their importunate chink, whilst thousands of great cattle, reposed beneath the shade of the British oak, chew the cud and are silent, pray do not imagine that those who make the noise are the only inhabitants of the field; that, of course, they are many in number; or that, after all, they are other than the little, shriveled, meager, hopping, though loud and troublsome, insects of the hour.

Edmund Burke

Create-A-Right

There is a local story about the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (“UPMC”) who own most of the hospitals in the surrounding area.  They do not own all of the facilities, but they are getting there.  Even though they are a non profit organization,

You can always tell a true "grassroots" protest by the large crowds holding hand lettered signs.

they are still a business and have to make some unpopular decisions.  A few months ago UPMC announced that it was closing one of its hospitals that did not have enough patients to make it viable.

The Death Of Common Sense

Death of common senseA had this book a while and thought that it would be a good one to follow The Law by Frederic Bastiat reviewed last week.  Although published fifteen years ago The Death of Common Sense provides a direct insight into the substitution of common sense for bureaucracy in America.  Common sense and responsibility is replaced with tens of thousands of pages of rules that promote inaction rather than progress.  Having worked for many years in government I can attest to the ability of civil servants to skillfully avoid decisions contrary to the letter of the regulation even though they make complete sense.