Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘revolution’

Rules for Radical Conservatives

“Ivan is thrilled.  Mikhail is devastated.  All their lives, they have been equal, the way good Soviet Men should be.  They had nothing, and nothing is what they shared equally.  You could not have asked for a purer expression of true communism.  As Mikhail watches Ivan’s lot improve, he seethes.  He complains to the local soviet, but there’s nothing they can do, because even in the U.S.S.R., it’s not against the law to have a cow.  Mikhail briefly considers reporting his friend to the Cheka, but finally decides against it; after all, he’s not a bad man, just a poor man…he does something he’d almost forgotten how to do.  He prays…’All my life I have striven to be a good atheist and not believe in you.  But now, I humbly come to you directly.  Please, God, please hear my prayer.  Please make us equal again.’  For a moment all is silent.  Then, to his utter amazement, a voice emerges out of the clouds, a voice that only he can hear, ‘Mikhail,’ says God, ‘your prayers have been answered.  You shall be made equal again.’  Mikhail leaps to his feet in disbelief.  A look of transfigured radience plays across his noble Slavic peasant features.  He cannot believe his good fortune. ‘Oh good!’ he exclaims. ‘You’re going to kill Ivan’s cow!”

Underlying Social Contract

“You built a factory out there? Good for you. But I want to be clear: you moved your goods to market on the roads the rest of us paid for; you hired workers the rest of us paid to educate; you were safe in your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. You didn’t have to worry that marauding bands would come and seize everything at your factory, and hire someone to protect against this, because of the work the rest of us did. Now look, you built a factory and it turned into something terrific, or a great idea? God bless. Keep a big hunk of it. But part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along.”

We The Living

In most of my reviews I try very hard not to betray the story and allow you to discover it on your own.  In fiction I rarely tell more than what you might read on the inside cover and usually even less.  The fact that We the Living was Ayn Rand’s first novel blows me away.  She admits that many of the characters were influenced by her life.  From her Forward;

The Law

The Law2Just a few days ago I commented on my desire for Americans to learn more about economics.  I also finished the post adding the need to learn about history.  The writings of Frederic Bastiat prove this second point.  Bastiat died in 1850 yet 160 years after his death words speak to many of the issues that we encounter today. 

In The Law, written shortly before his death, Bastiat makes a compelling case that law in France at the  time was being misused to commit legal plunder.  Laws passed that allow government to take from one person and give it to other persons to whom it does not belong do not change the fact that something is TAKEN from the first person or plundered.  The passage of such laws make the plunder legal.  We most recognize this plunder in the form of taxes.

Rules For Radicals

Hardly a day goes by without some pundit describing the lefts’ playbook written by Saul Alinsky.  Based on the descriptions, I half expected to be treated to a barrage of 1960’s “kill the establishment” claptrap.  Being born in the early part of that decade, I was more worried about tomorrow’s pick up baseball game than world politics, but I was aware of the strife.  Much of my perceptions of the period was formed in front of the television.