Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘principles’

Blinded By The D.C. Lights

While many of us conservatives are not the least bit surprised that Democrat leaders don’t understand the hopes, fears, desires, expectations we have for our country, I have been more than a little surprised at the blindness of so many Republicrats to the same issues.  As a registered Republican (though not for long – can you say independent) I was rather discouraged when our presidential nominee was ordained long before the primary in my state.  Even more perplexing was the fact that Democrat voters and pundits had more say in that selection than millions of registered Republicans.  The turnout in the 2008 election is a testament to the disgust many of us felt, though I swallowed and voted for Palin/McCain.

Getting Naked

I was not deceived by the title of this book.  In Getting Naked author Patrick Lencioni uses a fable to outline his theory about “the three fears that sabotage client loyalty.”  I was in the middle of another book when this came in the mail.  I like to read when I have to eat alone and my book was in another part of the house so I started to read Getting Naked. 

Jon Galt, Jr.??

Ayn Rand’s famous character from Atlas Shrugged railed against big government and a nanny state.  Many of us find inspiration in his words and actions to bolster capitalism;

“I ask for nothing more or nothing less than what I earn. That is justice. I don’t force anyone to trade with me; I only trade for mutual benefit. Force is the great evil that has no place in a rational world. One may never force another human to act against his/her judgment. If you deny a man’s right to Reason, you must also deny your right to your own judgment. Yet you have allowed your world to be run by means of force, by men who claim that fear and joy are equal incentives, but that fear and force are more practical.”

The Economic Naturalist

Economic NaturalistI had recently been “in search of explanations for everyday enigmas” when I happened upon a book by Robert H. Frank.  Frank believes that “even those who have taken an economics course in college typically emerge with little working knowledge of basic economic principles.  I agree and in The Economic Naturalist Frank compiles numerous examples from everyday life.  While the title may scare many people away, it is an entertaining book to read and is not at all dry.  Through Frank’s examples you get a great background on how the free market and economics play a role in many unusual ways.