Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘peace’

Enemy of Mine

enemy of mineFirst off I am amazed at how far author Brad Taylor has improved as a writer and storyteller.  Awesome.  In his latest Pike Logan thriller, Enemy of Mine, the members of the Taskforce jump around Europe and the middle east trying to stop an old nemesis and discover perhaps a bigger threat.  Taylor touches on some of the terrorist organizations in the regions which would certainly cause criticism…not because it isn’t true, but because we don’t talk about it.  There are many in the Middle East who are against the peace process and will go to great lengths to stop it.

Coptic Ruse

The Coptic Christians are perhaps some of the most faithful Christians and they have to be as their places of worship seem to in Middle East countries dominated by Islam. As a minority surrounded by many hostile people their faith must be strong. I have to admit that I know very little about this church other than occasional news stories where one of their churches happened to be burned down during Muslim protests.

A recent headline from The Washington Post caught my eye recently,

Piecemeal Peace Deal

In case you haven’t noticed Afghanistan has sort of become a major hotbed of resistance to our military.  There has been heavy fighting and far too many deaths of our military personnel.  One thing that seems the most disappointing to me about Iraq and Afghanistan is how the local citizens do not seem fully committed to their freedom.  As Americans I am not sure that we can completely understand this because most of us were born free and continue to live free.

The Case For Democracy

In his book, Decision Points, President George W. Bush mentioned the impact of a book authored by a former Soviet dissident.  Natan Sharansky spent years in Soviet prisons simple because he was Jewish, wanted to leave the USSR, and was vocal about it.  Sharansky shares his experiences first as a political prisoner in the Soviet Union then as an Israeli official.  The Case For Democracy is his story and history as it relates to his experiences in perhaps the two most threatening periods of our time; The Cold War, and The Global War On Terror.  Sharansky provides a compelling case showing “the power of freedom to overcome tyranny & terror.”