Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘nixon’

Separated At Birth – Nixon/Obama

obamanixon final

President Richard Milhouse Nixon:  The Watergate scandal was a political scandal that occurred in the United States in the 1970s as a result of the June 17th 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C., and the Nixon administration’s attempted cover-up of its involvement. The scandal eventually led to the resignation of Richard Nixon, the President of the United States, on August 9, 1974 — the only resignation of a U.S. President. The scandal also resulted in the indictment, trial, conviction, and incarceration of 43 people, including dozens of Nixon’s top administration officials.  The affair began with the arrest of five men for breaking and entering into the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate complex on June 17, 1972. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) connected cash found on the burglars to a slush fund used by the Committee for the Re-Election of the President, a fundraising group for the Nixon campaign. [Source – Wikipedia]

MLK, Jr. Was a Republican

Many times as I read an article I find a few sentences that capture the essence of the piece. In “Phrase-e-ology” I’ll post some thought followed by key phrases. As always I’ll have a link (in blue) to the original article.

A few years ago Human Events posted an article about Martin Luther King, Jr. and the fact that he was in fact a Republican and generally, and contrary to the fiction taught and put forward by media, the Democrats fought AGAINST rights for blacks.  It is appropriate to review the FACTS (not the liberal narrative) about Mr. King, Jr., the Democrats, and the civil rights movement.

The Liberal Hour

I guess I’d describe reading this book as if I was walking in a strange world…a liberal world…I didn’t like it.  It is interesting that liberals, like author John Kenneth Galbraith, from that era (this book was first published in 1960) were not quite as socialistic as they are today.  They were socialistic, but not as shrill.  Perhaps one of the endorsements on the back cover says it best, “a reasoned attack on the productivity ethic and a concrete, provocative program for altering the economic structure to maintain a new social balance.”  [emphasis added]