Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘my favorite’

Crusty Conundrum

A famous economic fable by Henry Hazlitt is the Broken Window Fallacy where folks believe that there is economic stimulus achieved by breaking the window of a baker shop forcing the owner to replace the glass.  The Crusty Conundrum is my foray into economic fallacies…

Our story starts at the Ché Pizza Parlor, a new age pizza parlor in that they make socially responsible pizza and deliver them in hybrid compact cars.  One day the owner was in a pinch when one of her delivery persons called off to go protest something.  You see Ché Pizza provided its employees with “social justice” time much like traditional employers provided vacation or leave time.  Left with no other options the owner donned her cap and started to make deliveries. 

News Briefs – Volume IV

News briefs are my collection of interesting news stories that may not warrant a full post…

Brief 1:  It seems like the citizens of Japan want the U.S. out of their country.  The UK Daily Mail reported that thousands of protesters called for the removal of all of the estimated 47,000 U.S. troops.  Apparantly our troops are noisy and pollute as they protect the pacific rim.  I say bring em home.  Why spend our tax dollars to boost the Japanese economy.  There are a lot of communities in the United States that would welcome them and the money they spend.  We also need to take all of our equipment and defense technology too.  While we are at it, we can take them out of Germany too.

Comprehensive (kom – pri – hen – siv)

Comprehensive is defined as:

“So large in scope or content as to include much.”

Synonyms:  complete, broad, wide, full, sweeping, exhaustive, extensive.

What does Wolf Blitzer think:

“I think what we try to do is bring the news to our viewers in a very comprehensive responsible way”  This is CNN?

Can you use it in a sentence?

Politicians often use the word comprehensive when they introduce a piece of legislation when the want the American people to think they are being thoughtful and forward-thinking.  Most citizens who pay attention know that when an elected official uses the word comprehensive to describe a bill, a rule, a policy, etc. that it actually means that it is full of things they do not want you to really know about.   [Okay that is two sentences]

Consent To Kill

“…politicians were all that way.  They honestly believed in their personal power of persuasion.  These were the men and women who never stopped campaigning.  Every dry cleaner, bar, and cafe they stopped in, every golf outing and fund raiser they hit, they shook hands, smiled, remembered an amazing number of names and convinced people though nothing more thatn their personality that they were likable.  These men and women excelled in politics.  They were willing to make to make concessions and be flexible so others thought them reasonable.  On the international stage, though, these types got taken to the cleaners.  Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister at the onset of WWII, was the classic modern example.  He had met Hitler, looked him in the eye, made him laugh, and concluded that he was a decent chap despite the evidence to the contrary that had been provided by the British intelligence services.  Hitler took Chamberlain for a fool and played him through the occupation of Austria, the invasion of Poland, and right on up to the invasion of France.  Somehow Hitler had been able to resist the irresistible charm of Chamberlain.”

Stats Rhats

Many years ago I was fortunate to be invited on a school trip to Gettysburg National Military Park.  That trip sparked a love affair with the city and the Civil War.  If you are from below the Mason-Dixon line you would call it the War Between the States.  A favorite book about that era is The Killer Angels which was the basis of a favorite movie, Gettysburg.

One of ending scenes of the movie was an encounter between some captured Confederate soldiers and Union soldiers after the epic Picket/Pettigrew charge.  The southerners were resting on some fencing when one of the Union officers asked the prisoners why they were fighting this war.  One of the Confederates answered that they were fighting for “Stats Rhats.’ 

Obamagear

A funny thing happened when I was recently looking to buy my first Obamagear t-shirt.  I was interested in finding a unique shirt, but I just could not find what I was looking for.  Should I go for the “believe” shirt or opt for the classic “Yes We Can?”  I was actually leaning more toward the “Yes We Did” design. 

As I was looking at web sites, I was pleased to find that I could buy all of my Obamagear easily at the NBC News Apparel web site.  I could even purchase a bobblehead (there has to be a joke there), a collection of campaign photographs, and my favorite the Obama Action Figure.  Unable to wait any longer, I dashed off my order.

Super Bowl XLIII Results Overturned

Tampa, Florida:   In a surprising move, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced this morning that the Pittsburgh Steelers would NOT be awarded their sixth Lombardi Trophy.  Goodell and the league seemingly bowed to pressure from the Justice Organization for Losing Teams (“JOLT“) to spread the trophies around and award the trophy to the Arizona Cardinals.  The Cardinals have never won the Super Bowl.

JOLT President, Trevor Sexton hailed the decision as he protested in front of Mr. Goodell’s home with the four other members of JOLT; “This is a great day for sports justice.  The Pittsburgh Steelers already had FIVE Lombardi Trophies and that is just not fair to the other teams.”  Sexton added;  “It is great that the NFL is embracing the issue of fairness.”