Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘military’

The REAL Vietnam History Lesson

General VoNguyen Giap:  General Giap was a brilliant, highly respected leader of the North Vietnam military. The following quote is from his memoirs currently found in the Vietnam war memorial in Hanoi :

‘What we still don’t understand is why you Americans stopped the bombing of Hanoi . You had us on the ropes. If you had pressed us a little harder, just for another day or two, we were ready to surrender! It was the same at the battle of TET. You defeated us!  We knew it, and we thought you knew it.  But we were elated to notice your media was helping us. They were causing more disruption in America than we could in the battlefields. We were ready to surrender. You had won!’ 

No Easy Day

I had not planned on reading the “firsthand account of hte mission that killed Osama Bin Laden (UBL),” but there has been so much writhing and hand-wringing and threats and whining I thought that I’d weigh in and give the former Navy SEAL some of my hard EARNED money. No Easy Day, first off, is an extremely well written book that grabbed me and forced me to read it in about a day.  One may want to give credit to the co-author, Kevin Maurer, but I have to remember that to be a SEAL doesn’t just mean that you are good at killing people.  These young men are the best of the best and then the best of those are chosen to be special operations forces.  Mark Owen (a psuedonym – he has since been outed, but I won’t do that) shares some of his other missions leading to UBL’s untimely death (it should have been many years before).

High Crimes

A Boston upscale family enjoys a quick family meal at the local mall.  As they leave the restaurant their lives are shattered forever.  How is that for a tease?  One of the difficult things for me in doing a book review for novels is to give some sense of the story without divulging too much.  I don’t personally even read the inside of the dust jacket as they often give away the first fourth of the book. High Crimes is no different as it really spills a lot of the proverbial beans.

Update: News Briefs – Volume XXXI – Very UnCONSTITUTIONAL

As I was driving to work this morning I thought of perhaps one of the best (i.e. worst) examples of unconstitutional actions by our federal government;

Brief 6:  Shortly after the new year began in 2012 President Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act.  Tucked into the bill is a provision that many believe greatly expands the ability of the federal government take you into custody and hold you indefinitely;

Piecemeal Peace Deal

In case you haven’t noticed Afghanistan has sort of become a major hotbed of resistance to our military.  There has been heavy fighting and far too many deaths of our military personnel.  One thing that seems the most disappointing to me about Iraq and Afghanistan is how the local citizens do not seem fully committed to their freedom.  As Americans I am not sure that we can completely understand this because most of us were born free and continue to live free.

The Apostle

Common knowledge about Afghanistan and Afghans is generally about how rough a country it is; how inhospitable both the landscape and the residents can be.  It is hard for those of us in the west to imagine a world of dominated by warlords, tribes, and a culture that seems stuck in the first century.  Brad Thor takes us for a brief peek into their lives and gives us a glimpse of what they face.  I get the sense that even though this is a novel, Thor presents an accurate depiction of the troubled country and the battles our military endure.

The Art Of War

Perhaps one of the most famous ancient books on warfare, Sun-tzu’s The Art of War has been translated many times.  This translation by Ralph D. Sawyer caught my eye in a book store and I had been wanting to read it for some time.

As I began reading I expected some introductions, explanations, etc., but what I did not expect or want was 162 pages of history before even getting to Sun-tzu.  I could only read sixty pages before I found myself flipping ahead to the thirteen sections of The Art Of War.  My impatience got the best of me, but I really wanted to read only Sun-tzu’s work and I found it very interesting and perhaps would be useful reading by some of our political leaders.