Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘middle east’

Enemy of Mine

enemy of mineFirst off I am amazed at how far author Brad Taylor has improved as a writer and storyteller.  Awesome.  In his latest Pike Logan thriller, Enemy of Mine, the members of the Taskforce jump around Europe and the middle east trying to stop an old nemesis and discover perhaps a bigger threat.  Taylor touches on some of the terrorist organizations in the regions which would certainly cause criticism…not because it isn’t true, but because we don’t talk about it.  There are many in the Middle East who are against the peace process and will go to great lengths to stop it.

With Friends Like These

Daniel Powter sang about having a bad day, but Obama’s next career, besides criticizing President Romney and organizing things, may be as a singer.  His one hit may be titled With Friends Like These.  Without further ado…

Washington Post and Richard Cohen had this article:

The president who seems not to care

In their defense they did use the word “seems” in this article, but it was rather blunt for a liberal newspaper;

The Fallen Angel

“He was below average in height – five foot eight, perhaps, but no more – and had the spare physique of a cyclist.  The face was long and narrow at the chin, with wide cheekbones and a slender nose that looked as though it had been carved from wood.  The eyes were an unnatural shade of green”

Coup D’Etat

I may have a new super hero to enjoy reading about.  Although he is fictional author Ben Coes makes a good case to put him close to the company of Gabriele Allon, Alex Hawke, Scot Harvath, and Mitch Rapp.  In Coup d’Etat evil again rears its ugly head in the Middle East as tensions broil between India and Pakistan.  Mix in two countries that don’t like each other, historic tensions, nuclear weapons, terrorists, jihadists, and loads of money and you just might get a coup.  Coes’ hero is ex-black ops guy who really wants to be off the grid.  Dewey Andreas gets pulled back in to take on a near-suicidal mission.

Outlaw Platoon

“A year before, I had been a partying college student, obsessed with The Lord of the Rings and hte Harry Potter books.  Getting to class and writing to papers had been pretty much the limit of my responsibilities.  Now I was a leader in a combat zone, entrusted with the role after the army had invested millions of dollars in my training.  Any decision I made could have unseen consequences.  I second-guessed myself constantly, concealed it from the men, and did my best to absorb every lesson thrown my way.”

News Briefs – Volume XXVIII

News briefs are a collection of interesting news stories…

Brief 1: Call out the “gender pedagogues” as the heading of this post News “Briefs” may not be gender neutral. Actually the gender pedagogues were hired by the Edalia preschool in Stockholm Swedento help staff identify language and behavior that risk reinforcing stereotypes” so that boys are no longer boys and girls are no longer girls…they are all referred to as “friends.” How cute! And when visitors come they don’t refer to “him” or “her” they call them “he

Coptic Ruse

The Coptic Christians are perhaps some of the most faithful Christians and they have to be as their places of worship seem to in Middle East countries dominated by Islam. As a minority surrounded by many hostile people their faith must be strong. I have to admit that I know very little about this church other than occasional news stories where one of their churches happened to be burned down during Muslim protests.

A recent headline from The Washington Post caught my eye recently,

News Briefs – Volume XXII

News briefs are a collection of interesting news stories…

Brief 1: What are the REAL chances of meaningful tort reform in the United States when one of the men responsible for that task files a lawsuit. Representative Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) is suing the company that runs the cafeteria at the Longworth House Office Building. The suit claims that his veggie sandwich “contained dangerous substances, namely an olive pit, that a consumer would not reasonably expect to find in the final product served.” So when you get something with olives it is not reasonable to possibly find a pit once in a while? Since when is an olive pit a “dangerous substance?” Kucinich is only asking for $150,000 to cover his “permanent dental and oral injuries requiring multiple surgical and dental procedures,” and he also wants compensation for his pain, suffering, and loss of enjoyment. I can imagine the heartfelt testimony as Kucinich describes his crippling fear of olives and not even being able to stand the sight of Popeye’s girlfriend.  Perhaps it would have been more fitting if the dangerous substance had been a nut.

Piecemeal Peace Deal

In case you haven’t noticed Afghanistan has sort of become a major hotbed of resistance to our military.  There has been heavy fighting and far too many deaths of our military personnel.  One thing that seems the most disappointing to me about Iraq and Afghanistan is how the local citizens do not seem fully committed to their freedom.  As Americans I am not sure that we can completely understand this because most of us were born free and continue to live free.

The Case For Democracy

In his book, Decision Points, President George W. Bush mentioned the impact of a book authored by a former Soviet dissident.  Natan Sharansky spent years in Soviet prisons simple because he was Jewish, wanted to leave the USSR, and was vocal about it.  Sharansky shares his experiences first as a political prisoner in the Soviet Union then as an Israeli official.  The Case For Democracy is his story and history as it relates to his experiences in perhaps the two most threatening periods of our time; The Cold War, and The Global War On Terror.  Sharansky provides a compelling case showing “the power of freedom to overcome tyranny & terror.”