Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘lincoln’

Abraham Lincoln

lincolnOnly to better express myself…

Abraham Lincoln

A few days ago some of us acknowledged the birth (February 12, 1809) of President Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Lincoln may be the most written about figure in the brief history of the United States and I have read quite a few of the volumes. Lincoln is an intriguing figure, but one thing I find most interesting is how he used anecdotes to get his point across. This was highlighted in a book Lincoln On Leadership and illustrated in the recent Lincoln movie starring Daniel Day Lewis. Here are some of my favorite Lincoln quote to honor the man.

America’s Prophet

Author Bruce Feiler takes a hike through American history looking at parallels between people and American icons and the Biblical figure of Moses. America’s Prophet  provides some historical background on Moses’ journey, what he represents and juxtaposes those to many historic Americans like Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr. and icons like the Statue of Liberty and the Liberty Bell.  It is amazing to read REAL history that shows how powerful a link there is between the American ideal and biblical beliefs rather than more recent interpretations representing America as a secular nation,

Liberal Alters – Minority-Friendly Politics

Perhaps the most successful aspect of liberal politics has been their stranglehold on what is called the “main-stream” media. Though that has diminished over the last decade it is still an extremely powerful tool for progressive/liberal. I can think of no better example of this than the mischaracterization that Republicans/conservatives hate minorities while the Democrats/liberals are their champions. The evidence to the contrary is staggering yet is rarely noted when discussions of race enter the dialogue. The blatant disregard of FACTS when making arguments about race boggles my mind though I can understand that as long as liberals get away with it they’ll use it.

Keeping Up With The Jones

The joke goes;  A Brit, a Canadian, a Croatian, a Frenchman, a German, an Irishman, a Mexican, a Romanian, a Dutchman, a Norwegian, a South Korean, and a Swede rush out of a bar one day.  Barry the bartender says “What’s the hurry?  Did someone spill something?

The joke unfortunately is on us as our federal goverment has refused the help of these nations to control and clean up the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Many of us seriously have our doubts that the White House was on top of things from “day one,” but the linked article provides a glimpse into the fact that many of our allies offered help in our hour of need.  The Dutch, in particular, offered help almost from DAY ONE.  Here we are nearly two months later and the Obama administration is still refusing help from other countries.

Battle Cry of Freedom

I am a bit of a Civil War buff.  It started with a trip to Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania.  The Civil War and Gettysburg are two of the most written about subjects in American writing.  I have read numerous books on the glorious battles and the heroic efforts of the combatants.  Their personal stories inspire and make you cry at the same time. 

James M. McPherson is one of the premier writers about that period and as a Pulitzer Prize winner you would expect his work to be first-rate.  I found Battle Cry of Freedom different than other books about that era.  McPherson’s chronology of the period includes a great deal of  “behind the scenes” information about the conflict; the politics, the media, the politicians.