Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘FDR’

In The Year 2525

The year 2525 is probably the year when we “officially” find out from historians that conservatives were right and that Barney Frank and Democrat policies started the global financial meltdown and Obama’s policies like the Stimulus, Obamacare, and Dodd-Frank prolonged the agony.  That is because history is mostly written by liberal academics (I know that is redundant) and they have a slightly biased view of the world.

I am exagerating about the date 514 years from now, but consider that until recently most historical accounts of the Great Depression give FDR credit for ending it.  There have been books like The Forgotten Man which set the record straight, but few probably read this.  However nearly seventy years after the depression ended two UCLA economists place the blame where it belongs…on FDR.

True American Hero – Lord Christopher Monckton

Sail on, O Ship of State!
Sail on, O Union, strong and great!
Humanity with all its fears,
With all the hopes of future years,
Is hanging breathless on thy fate!

moncktonThe begining of this Longfellow poem was used by Lord Christopher Moncton to end his address at Bethel University last week.  I had never heard that poem before, but Lord Monckton told the audience that it was also used by Winston Churchill in an address to FDR as we entered World War II.  It shows the deep love, respect, and hope that our country represents to many in the world.  Lord Monckton also said these touching words:

The Worst Economy Since the Great Depression

This will be an unusual post for me.  I am going to use mostly quotes to tell a story.  A story that I hope will propel you to action.

“The crash was the honest acknowledgement of the breakdown of capitalism…caused by speculating margin traders brought down the nation.”

“The country, he believed, had grown too fast:  beyond ‘our natural and normal growth.’  The problem was that there had been ‘an era of selfishness.’  There existed ‘throughout the nation men and women, forgotten in the political philosophy’ of the last years.”

The Forgotten Man

“As soon as A observes something which seems to him to be wrong, from which X is suffering, A talks it over with B, and A and B then propose to get a law passed to remedy the evil and help X.  Their law always proposes to determine…what A, B, and C shall do for X.”  But what about C?  There was nothing wrong with A and B helping X.  What was wrong was the law, and the indenturing of C to the cause.  C was the forgotten man, the man who paid, “the man who never is thought of.”