Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘cia’

Pursuit Of Honor

As I contemplated this review of Vince Flynn’s latest (until this November) Mitch Rapp novel which I finished last night, I found an Associated Press article that best expresses one of the main themes of the novel.  I have often wondered, hell even hoped, that America had men and women dedicated to the destruction of our enemies.  Those who are focused on doing harm to the United States need to be dealt with.  We never really know them, their exploits, and how they keep us safe.

Extreme Measures

Torture, enhanced interrogation, or Extreme Measuresare different ways to describe an attempt to gather information from an enemy using techniques that may make many squeamish.  Most of us are abhorrent to any methods that involve knives, bullets in sensitive areas, whips, or even razor blades.  What if the enemy had knowledge that you needed right away to save your father, mother, wife, or child?

What then would you do to get that information?  If you only had 20 minutes to save your loved one and the person wanted his lawyer would you provide one?  My guess is that you would do pretty much anything to save your child.  I would.  So what happens to you after the dust has settled?  You have broken the law.  Vince Flynn tackles this subject with CIA operative Mitch Rapp.

Act of Treason

The author has a simple subtitle to this book, “A Thriller.”  I love the Mitch Rapp series and this book lives up to the subtitle as a thriller. Act Of Treason is different as Rapp is almost part of the sub-plot.  The real story is about Washington power and those who would do most anything to achieve that power.

Author Vince Flynn uses the usual cast of characters in this exciting novel.  Act of Treason doesn’t have as much of the covert operations-type danger as past Rapp novels which is a nice change.  I could kind of figure out what was going to happen in many places and I liked that. 

The Silent Man

I was looking for a quick book to read as I took a break from Tim Ferris’ Four Hour Work Week.  It is not that the book is bad, but there is so much to absorb that I wanted something mindless.  The Silent Man caught my eye as I searched the newly released paperbacks.  None other than the New York Times extolled it virtues; “The Silent Man succeeds in seizing the attention from the start and never letting go.”

Consent To Kill

“…politicians were all that way.  They honestly believed in their personal power of persuasion.  These were the men and women who never stopped campaigning.  Every dry cleaner, bar, and cafe they stopped in, every golf outing and fund raiser they hit, they shook hands, smiled, remembered an amazing number of names and convinced people though nothing more thatn their personality that they were likable.  These men and women excelled in politics.  They were willing to make to make concessions and be flexible so others thought them reasonable.  On the international stage, though, these types got taken to the cleaners.  Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister at the onset of WWII, was the classic modern example.  He had met Hitler, looked him in the eye, made him laugh, and concluded that he was a decent chap despite the evidence to the contrary that had been provided by the British intelligence services.  Hitler took Chamberlain for a fool and played him through the occupation of Austria, the invasion of Poland, and right on up to the invasion of France.  Somehow Hitler had been able to resist the irresistible charm of Chamberlain.”

A P.C. War

Whether you want to call it a “war on terror” as George W. Bush would or an “overseas contingency operation” as our current president prefers, we are at war.  At least those who are waging battle against us are at war.  I am not sure that politicians in Washington are at war or that the general public quite feels the war.  This war almost came home to us again on Christmas Day with a Nigerian terrorist.

Executive Power

Executive PowerMitch is back and that means another great book for me to read.  Author Vince Flynndoes it again with CIA operative Mitch Rapp.  I am going to be very disappointed when I finish reading these books.  In the fourth novel, Executive Power, Rapp continues to battle global terrorism.  Though supposedly “retired” from the field he keeps his hand in the battles to protect our country. 

In this novel, America is not directly threatened, but Rapp and the CIA travel the world to combat extremists.  I am obviously reading the Rapp novels years after they were first published (Executive Power was published in 2003) and it is interesting to think about what was happening in American back then.  I found these two excerpts particularly interesting:

Separation of Power

Separaton of PowerI just cannot get enough of Vince Flynn to satisfy my thirst for “edge of my seat,” thrilling action.  Flynn combines Washington backstabbing (AKA politics) with a world-wide crisis in which most of the world is unaware to keep us up far into the early morning reading.  In my case I was awake until after 2:00 AM reading Separation of Powerstarring CIA operative Mitch Rapp. 

There is a strong connection between this book and Flynn’s previous novel, The Third Option as Rapp works to find out who tried to have him killed.  The intrigue reaches the top of American and foreign governments while the President wrestles with the confirmation of a new CIA director and the fact that Saddam Hussein is close to having three nuclear weapons. 

The Third Option

the third optionThis is my second venture into Vince Flynn’snovels featuring spymaster Mitch Rapp “one of the most lethal and efficient killers the CIA has ever produced.”  The Third Option refers to what some might consider the last option when dealing with adversaries.  In this novel, Flynn pulled me in and kept me on the edge of my seat, couch, bed, chair, or wherever I could steal time to read.  This book is so good, I found a lot of time to steal.

Separated At Birth – Whiplash/Holder

Whiplash - Holder

Snidely Whiplash was the tireless antagonist to Canadian Mountie, Dudley Do-Right, in the 1960s cartoon.  The tireless villain in the cartoon melodrama often made Nell Fenwick the object of his schemes where she often ended up tied to a railroad track.  Often foiled by Do-Right, Snidely never gave up his machinations to do evil.  Whiplash was portrayed as a bright yet evil man who was often beaten by a lesser Dudley.  One senses that the dual for “right” had been going on long before the series.