Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘career’

Uncommon

Uncommon can best be described as a self-help book for men written by a famous NFL coach.  Tony Dungy is an interesting man and even though he only played and coached for the Pittsburgh Steelers for a few years he did stand out as an uncommon man.  Subtitled “finding your path to significance,” Tony Dungy shares many personal examples and experiences of others to reinforce his thoughts on such subjects as character, fatherhood, friendship, mentoring, career, priorities, and faith.  It is obvious how much his belief in God steers his life which might seem a little at odds with his life as a successful professional football coach.  It was nice that he gave some recognition to players who share his values.  As a Pittsburgh Steeler fan I, of course, loved the references to the organization and none more than to former coach Chuck Noll, the greatest NFL coach ever (how many others can claim four NFL titles?). 

The Transparency Edge

“You cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individuals. To that end each of us must work for his own improvement”

Marie Curie

There are a myriad of self improvement books and I often find it helpful to review tips and techniques from these knowledgeable authors.  Originally published in 2004 The Transparency Edge recommends nine behaviors to help you become a better leader.   Authors Barbara Pagano and Elizabeth Pagano use examples from their years of experience working with large and small organizations to help their leaders improve. 

I Am From The Government – Try to Fire Me

Now that I am no longer a government employee I feel very comfortable criticizing government employees.  Actually I have always been comfortable criticizing government employees only now I cannot get in trouble…

I recently was honored to witness one of my former colleagues speak at a conference for technical people.  This person is not an technical person, but a lawyer.  The presentation was to provide information on common problems so that they can avoided by the attendees.  The attendees paid to attend the conference.