Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘apple’

Steve Jobs

“Genius, scattershot-friendly (that is when he needed something), special, bristly, detached, insensitive, sensitive, socially awkward loner, crazy, intense, aloof, crazed shaman, charismatic, creepy, dark, complex, manipulative, abusive, narcissistic, brutish, driven, full of bravado, cold, brutal, emotional, temperamental, bratty, tyrannical, anti-loyal, untrustworthy, tactical, obnoxious, impetuous, autocratic, and insanely great.”

Job’s Jobs Jabs

One of the things that I struggle with is the thought process of liberals.  I have friends and family who share this affliction (being liberal) and knowing them as I do I cannot understand their thought process regarding liberal issues/alters.  I really have tried to listen, to understand, to plot the way they think, a process that usually ends with my being frustrated and cutting off the conversation to avoid bad feelings. 

Perhaps the quintessential example illustrating my frustration is the recent “quotes” from the soon-to-be-released biography on Apple’s Steve Jobs.  Revered by virtually all for his contributions to technology and his leadership to one of America’s most iconic corporations…yes Apple is a CORPORATION!  Here are some of the excerpts attributed to Jobs;

Behind Every Great Philanthropist Is…

I heard a quote once that went something like this, “behind every great philanthropist is an equally great tragedy.”  Unfortunately I could find neither the exact quote or the wise man who said it.  Rush Limbaugh did a piece on large corporate giants Apple and Google and how they skillfully and legally avoid paying United States taxes on profits made overseas.  Both Apple and Google have created a socially responsible public image while conducting their businesses in perhaps a way that might seem hypocritical to the jaded person.

The Economic Naturalist

Economic NaturalistI had recently been “in search of explanations for everyday enigmas” when I happened upon a book by Robert H. Frank.  Frank believes that “even those who have taken an economics course in college typically emerge with little working knowledge of basic economic principles.  I agree and in The Economic Naturalist Frank compiles numerous examples from everyday life.  While the title may scare many people away, it is an entertaining book to read and is not at all dry.  Through Frank’s examples you get a great background on how the free market and economics play a role in many unusual ways.