Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘american’

Are You Gruber’d Up Yet?

grubergateI don’t hold much hope that anything earth-shaking will come of GruberGate (I am not sure if any news outlet used that yet) as politicians are out to score points for votes and are basically all big government wonks.  It is interesting that the lame-stream media is starting to be dragged into the fray (kicking and whimpering).  The videos are just too powerful to give them coverage to ignore the controversy.  I am not sure that I read this right or maybe I just cannot believe the HuffPo would dare go against Oblama, but the Weekly Standard reported;

Americn Individualism

The first thing that I learned about Margaret Hoover is that she is the great-granddaughter of President Herbert Hoover (I loved his dam).  She spent the first part of the book trying to edit the image many of us were taught about his legacy as president.  She made a nice effort and provided an endearing look at his life. American Individualism, however, was really about “how a new generation of conservatives can save the Republican Party” and that was the part that interested me.

She introduced me to a new generation, The Millennials, who were born between 1980 and 1999, and of whom I am a parent to three, are the newest and perhaps powerful voting block;

The Panther

I did a thing that I don’t like doing.  I read a book, The Panther, that was not the first in a “series.”  It was just sitting there all attractive in its silver dust jacket at Costco so I bought it.  I had started another, less exciting book, and wanted a good novel to read.  Author Nelson DeMille certainly delivered.  The Panther is a bad guy, a very bad man.  Perhaps the worst is that he is an American citizen who now has an intense hatred of America.  You can guess the religion to which he espouses, though that is not a big part of the book’s narrative.

The REAL Vietnam History Lesson

General VoNguyen Giap:  General Giap was a brilliant, highly respected leader of the North Vietnam military. The following quote is from his memoirs currently found in the Vietnam war memorial in Hanoi :

‘What we still don’t understand is why you Americans stopped the bombing of Hanoi . You had us on the ropes. If you had pressed us a little harder, just for another day or two, we were ready to surrender! It was the same at the battle of TET. You defeated us!  We knew it, and we thought you knew it.  But we were elated to notice your media was helping us. They were causing more disruption in America than we could in the battlefields. We were ready to surrender. You had won!’ 

Debate Deconstructed

I don’t like watching the debates. I DO NOT believe that debates matter as much as most pundits have been stating lately. I still find it hard to believe that here we are roughly three weeks from the presidential election and there are still so many “undecided” voters. Where have they been? Both Obama and Romney are pretty well known commodities so why the indecision? The real question should be why we put so much reliability and emphasis on a bunch of people who cannot make up their minds.

2016 Obama’s Amerika

I don’t particulary like going to movies.  If it is not a comedy or about a book that I love it is highly unlikely that you’ll find me there.  My wife, who has all of a sudden become interested in politics, suggested that we go see Dinesh D’Sousa’s film about Barrack Obama’s past.  We saw it a month ago and it is probably no longer in theatres.  We went to a matinee showing and the room was about one third full and they audience was mostly 45 years old and up.

…And intends to be the master

“It stands to reason that where there’s sacrifice, there’s someone collecting sacrificial offerings. Where there’s service, there’s someone being served. The man who speaks to you of sacrifice, speaks of slaves and masters. And intends to be the master.”

— Ayn Rand

1776

It’s not hard to guess what David McCullough’s book 1776  might be about. Besides the title, the cover painting featuring General George Washington kind of gave it away also. David McCullough provides a detailed portrait of the fledgling United States as they faced off against the formidable armies and navies of world leader Great Britain. Having grown up in a era when American history was taught in grade school I knew of some of the battles and troubles facing Washington. I even knew that his brilliant career got off to a rather rocky start, but the devil is in the details and McCullough provides many details in a very readable way.

Balance of Power

This is my first novel by James W. Huston and it certainly will not be my last.  I’d liken Balance of Power to a cross between John Grisham with the legal wrangling and Tom Clancy with his military insight and action.  The story begins when terrorists hijack an American merchant ship, the U.S. President acts passively, the Speaker of the House disagrees and the story’s hero and assistant to the Speaker finds a way to overide the Executive Office.  I found the novel extremely interesting and it was pretty much edge-of-my-seat towards the end.  In fact…don’t tell my boss, but I lost track of time yesterday at lunch and read past my lunch break.