Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘afghanistan’

No Easy Day

I had not planned on reading the “firsthand account of hte mission that killed Osama Bin Laden (UBL),” but there has been so much writhing and hand-wringing and threats and whining I thought that I’d weigh in and give the former Navy SEAL some of my hard EARNED money. No Easy Day, first off, is an extremely well written book that grabbed me and forced me to read it in about a day.  One may want to give credit to the co-author, Kevin Maurer, but I have to remember that to be a SEAL doesn’t just mean that you are good at killing people.  These young men are the best of the best and then the best of those are chosen to be special operations forces.  Mark Owen (a psuedonym – he has since been outed, but I won’t do that) shares some of his other missions leading to UBL’s untimely death (it should have been many years before).

Outlaw Platoon

“A year before, I had been a partying college student, obsessed with The Lord of the Rings and hte Harry Potter books.  Getting to class and writing to papers had been pretty much the limit of my responsibilities.  Now I was a leader in a combat zone, entrusted with the role after the army had invested millions of dollars in my training.  Any decision I made could have unseen consequences.  I second-guessed myself constantly, concealed it from the men, and did my best to absorb every lesson thrown my way.”

The OBA Administration

I’d like to suggest that the Obama Administration be renamed the OBA Administration or the Obama Back-Assward Administration.  When most of us have a problem we try to find and fix using logic.  For instance, my car was having some trouble starting so I had the battery and alternator checked.  If I were to act like the Obama Back-Assward Administration, I would probably have my key checked.  It would be funny except that these folks are “running” the country or should I say “ruining” the country…

Parse-imony – Karzai

In “Parse-imony” I break down current news stories with my pithy, running commentary…

First the headline:

Karzai demands that NATO halt airstrikes

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan President Hamid Karzai, angered by an airstrike that Afghan officials said killed 14 civilians during the weekend, demanded on Tuesday that the U.S.-led coalition halt aerial strikes on Afghan houses and threatened to take unspecified actions if the coalition doesn’t comply. [when one doesn’t possess a “big stick” or any stick for that matter it is best to leave out the specifics.]

Running Man

It is often interesting to look at the ease with which non-incumbent candidates can point to the incumbent’s record and critique their performance and bloviate about what they would do in similar situations. It is hard to prevent such a successful strategy and we have learned with the current resident of the White House that a blank slate can be a powerful tool when combined with a thorough lack of inspection of a candidate’s qualifications by both the main stream media and many of the voters.

Piecemeal Peace Deal

In case you haven’t noticed Afghanistan has sort of become a major hotbed of resistance to our military.  There has been heavy fighting and far too many deaths of our military personnel.  One thing that seems the most disappointing to me about Iraq and Afghanistan is how the local citizens do not seem fully committed to their freedom.  As Americans I am not sure that we can completely understand this because most of us were born free and continue to live free.

The Apostle

Common knowledge about Afghanistan and Afghans is generally about how rough a country it is; how inhospitable both the landscape and the residents can be.  It is hard for those of us in the west to imagine a world of dominated by warlords, tribes, and a culture that seems stuck in the first century.  Brad Thor takes us for a brief peek into their lives and gives us a glimpse of what they face.  I get the sense that even though this is a novel, Thor presents an accurate depiction of the troubled country and the battles our military endure.

GZM – A Few Thoughts

At the risk of having my head removed from my body I have a few thoughts on the GSM (Ground Zero Mosque) controversy:

  • I don’t see how Americans can look for legal means to stop the construction of the GZM.  If we are a nation of laws and the mosque meets the standards and rules then it should not be prevented.
  • I don’t see how Muslims who claim to be tolerant would in their wildest dreams would consider putting a mosque anywhere near the site of America’s greatest terrorist attack and carried out by Muslims. 

Update – Rules of Engagement

Update – many on the conservative side breathed a cautious sigh of relief when General David Petraeus was placed in charge of the NATO war effort in Afghanistan.  Not many criticized his predecessor, General Stanley McChrystal, but there were grumbles about how he handcuffed his troops through tight rules of engagement as discussed in the original post.

Patraeus was seen as perhaps more of a warrior who would take the gloves off and permit our soldiers to do what soldiers do in war…kill the enemy and break things.  To many Patraeus was Patton.  As expected General Patraeus did modify the complex rules of engagement in Afghanistan.  He actually made them even more stringent in an attempt to win the support of the Afghan people. 

Rules of Engagement

I walked into our living room a few nights ago and my daughter was watching Miracle which is the Hollywood version of the United States’ hockey team winning the Olympic Gold Medal at the 1980 games in Lake Placid, New York.  I had stuff to do, but I made the mistake of sitting down and got hooked.  I had seen the movie before and remembered the actual event (I even think I had saved the Sports Illustrated magazine that came out after the win).