Framing the Dialogue

Posts Tagged ‘afghan’

Service

My view of a Navy Seal has always been tinged with a lot of respect for the achievement at becoming the best of the best and then getting better.  Having read several books by Seals in the last year has only enhanced that view.  It can be thrilling to read about their exploits, sad when they get injured or lose one of their own, and joyous when they kill a bunch of the bad guys. Service is the second book by Lone Survivor author Marcus Luttrell  and he takes us through his second deployment to the Middle East as he deals with recovering from his injuries and getting back into Seal shape.

Outlaw Platoon

“A year before, I had been a partying college student, obsessed with The Lord of the Rings and hte Harry Potter books.  Getting to class and writing to papers had been pretty much the limit of my responsibilities.  Now I was a leader in a combat zone, entrusted with the role after the army had invested millions of dollars in my training.  Any decision I made could have unseen consequences.  I second-guessed myself constantly, concealed it from the men, and did my best to absorb every lesson thrown my way.”

Good For The Goose, But The Gander…Not So Much

The famous phrase of “What’s good for the goose is good for the gander” offers a message of justice.  I started thinking about that in light of recent events in the world and was astounded at how many examples that I found where the goose is treated differently than the gander…especially in politics and the Obama Regime in particular.

Parse-imony – Karzai

In “Parse-imony” I break down current news stories with my pithy, running commentary…

First the headline:

Karzai demands that NATO halt airstrikes

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan President Hamid Karzai, angered by an airstrike that Afghan officials said killed 14 civilians during the weekend, demanded on Tuesday that the U.S.-led coalition halt aerial strikes on Afghan houses and threatened to take unspecified actions if the coalition doesn’t comply. [when one doesn’t possess a “big stick” or any stick for that matter it is best to leave out the specifics.]

The Apostle

Common knowledge about Afghanistan and Afghans is generally about how rough a country it is; how inhospitable both the landscape and the residents can be.  It is hard for those of us in the west to imagine a world of dominated by warlords, tribes, and a culture that seems stuck in the first century.  Brad Thor takes us for a brief peek into their lives and gives us a glimpse of what they face.  I get the sense that even though this is a novel, Thor presents an accurate depiction of the troubled country and the battles our military endure.