Framing the Dialogue

Archive for June, 2019

The Lost Man

The Lost Man by Jane Harper takes us to the brutal world of rural Australia.  The land is unforgiving.  The rural community is stunned when one of their own is found far away from his car and safety.  How could this happen to someone who was raised in this world?  The investigation into his death looks like foul play.  His death opens many old wounds as the family and community grieve.

Killing the Rising Sun

“Enter this book. It comes with a warning: the following pages contain some extremely troubling material. The violence the world witnessed in 1945 is unprecedented in history and will be chronicled on the following pages in detail. What Martin Dugard and I are about to tell you is true and stark. The way the United States defeated the Japanese empire is vital to understand because the issues of that war are still being processed throughout the world today.”

The Final Day

“In this the third year since the Day, an economic trading system was again back in place, and it did include white lightning brewed in remote mountain valleys, but now included much else as well. Those with foresight to stockpile some precious metals found they indeed had real worth again; in fact, by the standards of this terrible new world, they could be counted as wealthy, the silver and gold not just something to be locked away in a safe for “just in case”—“just in case” had indeed arrived at last.”

Caraval

“Whatever you’ve heard about Caraval, it doesn’t compare to the reality. It’s more than just a game or a performance. It’s the closest you’ll ever find to magic in this world. Her grandmother’s words played in Scarlett’s head as she looked at the slips of paper in her hands. The Caraval stories she adored as a young girl never felt more real than they did in that moment. Scarlett always saw flashes of color attached to her strongest emotions, and for an instant goldenrod desire lit up inside her. Briefly, Scarlett let herself imagine what it would be like to go to Legend’s private isle, to play the game and win the wish. Freedom. Choices. Wonder. Magic. A beautiful, ridiculous fantasy.”

Angel Killer

I’d already read the second book in the Jessica Blackwood series by Andrew Mayne, but I like his novel so much I did the unthinkable…a read the first in the series after having read the second.  I don’t usually do that.  I am just loving Mr. Mayne’s work.

“He tried to teach me how to see too. Sometimes I think he taught me too well. But it was this skill that made me think I had a chance as a cop. I couldn’t go around making tigers appear to stop bank robbers. But seeing what was in front of me, drawing conclusions that others were oblivious to, that was a useful skill.”

Bad Blood

In this true story, Elizabeth Holmes fancied herself the next Steve Jobs…and she had the drive and personality to make many others feel the same.  This is based on a true story (I know that I’ve said this already, but if you read the book you’ll understand) yet it reads like a bizzaro world novel about Silicon Valley and the way that community “works”.  The subtitle of the book should tell you enough “Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup”.  The hook for you to read is that Holmes’ company was at one point valued as $10 billion.  

Name of the Devil

“The clues are here—at least the clues to what happened physically. But they don’t explain how or why. We have an explosion, but no victims. Just traces. Something tells me there’s more to this than just a bomb or a gas explosion.”

Author Andrew Mayne is fast becoming one of my favorite writers.  Name of the Devil is his second in the Jessica Blackwood series (I mistakenly read the second one first).  Blackwood comes from a magical family; that is they are a famous family of magicians.  She threw away her cape for an FBI badge and uses her magician skills to solve crimes.

One Year After

An EMP, actually several, are exploded over the United States, ending “civilization” within on second.  In his first novel, One Second After, William Forstchen gave us a glimpse of what that might look like in a small North Carolina town.  Now in One Year After, we get to see what is happening one year later in the same town.  We see society start to reemerge, but not all things happening are progress.  There is a “central” government, but are they for the people.  The folks in Black Mountain have a lot to do to continue to maintain their quest toward returning to normalcy.

Killing the SS

Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard have a gold mine of a formula for best selling novels.  I’d not read the past few after Killing Reagan as I thought that one was a bit of a stretch.  I heard good review of Killing the SS so I picked up a copy to read.  I was not disappointed.  The book chronicles “The Hunt for the Worst War Criminals in History.”  Their unspeakable crimes horrify us to this day.  

You know most of the names; now see what happens to them after the war.  One thing that astonished me was how openly some of these murders lived after the end of World War II.  Many barely changed their name.